Amazonプライム会員限定、3か月無料キャンペーン中

会員登録し、非会員価格の30%OFFで購入する

2022年7月25日までAmazonプライム会員限定で3か月無料キャンペーン中(プライム会員以外の方は30日間無料)。詳細はこちら。をご確認ください
会員は、12万以上の対象作品が聴き放題、オフライン再生可能
プロの声優や俳優の朗読で楽しめる
Audibleでしか聴けない本やポッドキャストも多数
無料体験終了後は月会費1,500円。いつでも退会できます。
¥ 500 で購入

¥ 500 で購入

下4桁がのクレジットカードで支払う
ボタンを押すと、Audibleの利用規約およびAmazonのプライバシー規約同意したものとみなされます。支払方法および返品等についてはこちら

あらすじ・解説

Tony Abbott: prime minister in waiting.

David Marr: the nation’s leading biographer and investigative journalist.

In Quarterly Essay 47, David Marr goes beyond the clichés - Dr No, mad monk, gaffe-prone, budgie-smuggling gym junkie - to look at the man as he is and reveal what kind of prime minister he might be.

This is a unique portrait of a unique politician. Marr shows Abbott as part reactionary and part pragmatist, part fighter and part charmer, deeply religious and deeply political. But is Abbott a figure from the past or a leader for the future?

Following the explosive Power Trip: The Political Journey of Kevin Rudd, this is certain to be the most discussed political writing of the year.

©2012 David Marr (P)2012 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Quarterly Essay 47: Political Animal: The Making of Tony Abbottに寄せられたリスナーの声

カスタマーレビュー:以下のタブを選択することで、他のサイトのレビューをご覧になれます。

レビューはまだありません。
並べ替え:
絞り込み:
  • 総合評価
    4 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    4 out of 5 stars
  • James
  • 2019/10/06

A compelling biography of a reprehensible man

Marr has written an engrossing political biography of one of my least-favourite public figures. I didn't know many of the details from earlier in Abbott's life, like the child he and his girlfriend gave up for adoption, or his university crusade to crush student unions, or his unabashed, explicit homophobia during those university days, so my mouth was frequently agape at learning another horrific detail.

Marr did take one cheap shot which annoyed me, at Abbott's propensity for cycling lycra and budgie smugglers, culminating in a barely-veiled joke about the size of his penis. I think dick-measuring should be beneath the scope of a quarterly essay, and I'm furthermore generally irritated by the popular ridicule of this aspect of Abbott's persona. The fact that he is comfortable with (even, god forbid, proud of) his body is in my opinion the least objectionable thing about him, and the fact that people fixated on it just shows the discomfort society holds for body positivity. Anyway, I know this shouldn't be the main takeaway, and I've probably already written too much about it, but it's something that has long irked me. That, and when people tore into him for biting that raw onion, which I always thought was clearly a joke on his part and was pretty funny.

The one most alarming pattern that became clear to me from this essay is that nothing seems to enrage and galvanise Abbott more than being beaten by a woman. This is what provoked the incident where he punched the wall beside his female opponent's head in his student politics days, and this is what presaged his relentless opposition to the Gillard government, which ravaged the Australian public's faith in politics and made the formerly bipartisan policy of pricing carbon emissions into a political third rail (most gallingly, Marr suggests that Abbott's reasons for throwing climate policy under the bus were entirely expedient, and that he had no particular personal conviction on the issue). Now that Abbott has been toppled from his former seat by Zali Steggall, I shudder to imagine what future plans he might have. Though he presently seems quarantined to a relatively safe position kissing up to defence contractors at the Australian War Memorial, the threat that he may be plotting some manner of comeback ever looms.