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あらすじ・解説

Crispin the mosaicist wants to concentrate on his art. Rustem of Kerakek, a physician, is also on his own journey of self-discovery. But no man may withdraw from society that easily, and both men soon find themselves drawn into the deadly webs of Sarantium.

Lord of Emperors is the sequel to Sailing to Sarantium.

©2000 Guy Gavriel Kay (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • sheepmom
  • 2018/08/06

Wonderful Listen

Guy Gavriel Kay's Lord of Emperor series is an interesting, thoughtful, well laid out story. I enjoy the way he develops his characters and you can never quite guess how a storyline will turn out. He richly develops his settings and the series is a great read. I thought the narrator expressed the characters' emotions and delivered the story in an interesting manner. I enjoyed this audible book and recommend it highly.

  • 総合評価
    4 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    4 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Eivind
  • 2012/07/26

Mosaic - part 2

A mosaicist goes to the big city, the most magnificent city in the world, the capital of the neighboring country which is incidentally intent on invading his war-torn homeland. Here he discovers or should it be rediscovers life, with all its intrigues.
He says all he wants to do is practice his craft, his art, but he is pulled into so much more by the beautiful empress the former dancing girl, her sworn enemy the gorgeous noble woman and of course there is the queen of his own about-to-be-invaded country. It is not a love triangle by any means, for these are powerful and inhumanly intelligent women, but let???s just say that Guy Gavriel Kay does not by any means shy away from describing them as lovely.
These books are more than the story of one man that goes to the city though, we are introduced and follow other people as well, and unlike many other books where the viewpoints shifts around from person to person we never really lose sight of what it is all about. For like any event in history it is all made out of different bits, many people with many different stories come together in a city in one place in time and together their stories and lives are placed next to each other like pieces of glass or stone a ceiling. It is only when we as the reader see it all from a distance that we see the mosaic it has become. Funny that.

  • 総合評価
    3 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    3 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Katherine
  • 2012/10/12

More melodrama

Originally posted at FanLit.
Lord of Emperors is the second (and final) novel in Guy Gavriel Kay’s THE SARANTINE MOSAIC duology. The story, set in a pseudo-Byzantine Empire, mostly centers on Crispin, a mosaicist from a neighboring kingdom who’s been commissioned to decorate the ceiling of a new chapel the emperor is building. Against his wishes, Crispin has been drawn into the Sarantine court’s political intrigue. In this second installment, the political turmoil finally comes to a head and Crispin’s life is, once again, drastically altered by events he can’t control. Not only are his and his friends’ lives in danger, but the changing political climate has major consequences for his art.

While reading Sailing to Sarantium, the first book in the THE SARANTINE MOSAIC, I had a hard time believing in the characters and the drama — I thought the plot lacked the world-shaking significance that the characters seemed to be overwhelmed by at every moment. I felt manipulated — like Kay was showing me murder, lust, adultery, shocking brutality, witty repartee, and titillating suggestions to make me feel like there was more going on than there really was. While I liked Kay’s characters, it felt like a big soap opera to me and I was impatient with the story.

The first part of Lord of Emperors is more of the slow drama and introspection that occurred in Sailing to Sarantium — every character analyzing what everyone else says, scrutinizing each gesture, contemplating every look, even reporting how they would think about this word or that gesture when they looked back on it sometime in the future. We’re reminded over and over how subtle and dangerous everybody is:

"The room seemed laden and layered with intricacies of past and present and what was to come. Nuances coiling and spreading like incense, subtle and insistent."

There are several sweet and touching scenes, but most of Lord of Emperors is more of the melodrama of Sailing to Sarantium. Finally, about 2/3 of the way through, there is a major upheaval followed by a slow unwinding of its tragic consequences. There are some real heartbreaking scenes in the last third of the novel, and the story ends on a beautifully bittersweet note. It just takes a really long time to get there.

Guy Gavriel Kay’s strength is making his characters come alive. Thus, when the big events finally occur, they really are painful and tragic and we worry about these people’s futures. I cared about Crispin, his queen, the charioteers, and the cook and his apprentice. However, I didn’t feel the need to be privy to every thought they had along the way — how many times do I need to be told that Crispin is thinking that only two women in the world wear a particular perfume? THE SARANTINE MOSAIC should have been trimmed down to just one book — I would have enjoyed it a lot more.

I also think I would have felt more appreciation for THE SARANTINE MOSAIC if I had read it earlier in my acquaintance with Guy Gavriel Kay’s work. His world and characters are so full of life, there’s so much drama and passion, and I admire the character development. At this point in my reading history, however, I can’t help but notice that Kay’s intrusive style, which I’ve always thought of as almost over-the-top, never changes. Now that I’ve read ten of his novels, what I once admired — the type of story, the deep characterization, that particular distinctive prose — starts to become tiresome. If you’re new to Kay, or if you can’t get enough of his style, you’ll have a better experience with THE SARANTINE MOSAIC than I did.

Again I listened to Audible Frontier’s audio production which was narrated by Berny Clark. Dialogue is his strength — I thought it was perfect. His narration is a little too slow (I had to speed him up) and I think some listeners will think it’s also a little bland, but I liked how his reading didn’t elevate Kay’s drama even further.

  • 総合評価
    3 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    4 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Kindle Customer
  • 2021/10/03

Love these characters, but just not enough plot

I've read this book (in paperback) multiple times. I read many of GGK's work multiple times. I'm still struggling to love this one. Without giving too much away, I will just say I was very disappointed this series didn't become a trilogy, and the way this second book is timed just leaves a lot of plot holes filled by minutiae of character struggles, with little in-depth character development. The narrator did a great job on the audiobook.

  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    3 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • KitnBit
  • 2021/05/21

save this wonderful book from this narrator

loved it but it's like ge never read or before. status or with no inflection, bi emotion. souls have read it first and gotten to know the characters so that he could put some real feeling into this rendition it was very tough for me to stick with it but the stories I know from guy are always wonderful

  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Arwe Thereyet
  • 2021/05/03

Be prepared

In Sailing to Sarantium, Guy Gavriel Kay sets you up. Then in Lord of Emperors, he rips your heart out, before handing it back to you with love.

  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Matt
  • 2021/04/28

So very worth reaching the plateau

Having come straight from the novel previous to this one, I’ll admit to growing a little weary and restless at times during (roughly) the first half of this second book. Once everything this novel was moving towards hit its stride, however, I never wanted to stop listening. It’s kind of painful to come to terms with saying goodbye to these characters. Some extraordinary storytelling by Kay and—another—epic achievement by Clark.

  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • htuy pat
  • 2021/04/02

I cried when this book ended

The story of this book is so rich, so captivating, so raw, and so human. The voice that read it did it justice, and the writer’s skill amazes me. I LOVED this book.

  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Blue
  • 2021/01/11

One of my all time favorites! So epic!

Hard to say much without spoiling. Aside from a little overly sexualized characters, this has to be one of my favorite books.

  • 総合評価
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    5 out of 5 stars
  • KBergin
  • 2020/09/16

The Byzantium trilogy is magnificent.

All three books set in this part of the world [The Lions of Al Rassan, set 400 years earlier; Sailing to Byzantium; & Lord of Emperors] show Guy Gavriel Kay at his height.

The last two books, which can be read alone, are filled with iridescent characters, danger, intrigue, religious mysteries, adventure, astounding beauty, and moments of unspeakable evil.

Their central character, Caspius Crispis, a mosaicist who is much more than the “artisan” he calls himself, carries us through the lowest and the highest of the great city, Syrantium, home to half a million from multiple ethnic and religious backgrounds and the Emperor and Empress, who have called for him, a foreigner, to design and apply an inspired mosaic to the largest temple dome in medieval Spain. His half year there, he spends among the both the court and the street, learning more than he should know. Especially the women.

This author, my favorite historical fantasy artist, forces us to inhabit the lives of his central multi-faceted characters so deeply that we sometimes fear the beginning of a new chapter. The prose is both beautiful and terrifying—one of the Kay’s gifts. This is no genre writer. He should be elevated to the heights of mainstream fiction. If you have never read his work, the two last volumes of this “trilogy” are a good beginning.

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  • 総合評価
    4 out of 5 stars
  • ナレーション
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ストーリー
    4 out of 5 stars
  • luke israel regan
  • 2021/08/07

a great journey

i enjoyed this sequal. not as fast paced as the first but the characters really came alive, and evolved.